Reason #1 to Ditch the Pitch: convincing vs. connecting

We love buying things, but hate being sold things.  We go shopping looking for stuff to buy, but we tell the persistent salesperson to leave us alone.  We like searching the web for information, but we cringe when online ads and pop-ups search for us.  We enjoy the idea of getting something, but we hate the prospect of being told what we “must have.”

Too often, we answer the question, “What do you do?” with a pitch…a carefully planned, diligently memorized, rapidly recited commercial that we hope, if delivered properly, will generate a sale.  We itemize what we sell rather than illustrate what we offer.  We focus on building awareness instead of creating interest.   We try to impress rather than engage.

In a world where advertisers are continually trying to get us to do, try, or buy something, there’s no benefit to telling people you’re the Grand Poobah of United Widgets Incorporated, makers of the world’s top-rated gold-standard gadgets and gizmos, located at the intersection of So-What Street and Who-Gives-A-Crap Boulevard.  If you really want people to respond to your message, it’s time to trade the commercial that tries to convince for an introduction that strives to connect.  It’s time to ditch the pitch!
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Ready to ditch the pitch and create a message that people respond to?
Contact R.J. today!

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Reason #7 to Ditch the Pitch: being stuck in someone’s head vs. being unforgettable

Commercials tend to cram a ton of information into a clever or catchy package that is delivered as consistently and frequently as possible. This is great for the seller, because it lodges their pitch in the minds of listeners where it will play when they need the product. Unfortunately for the listener, it plays other times too…while driving to work…or making dinner…or trying to concentrate on pretty much anything else. The pitch goes from being something people remember to something they can’t-get-out-of-their-head.

Given the chance to tell people about yourself or your business, you can recite a script you hope will repeat in people’s heads, or you can share an introduction that resonates in their minds and hearts.   You can restate things until they stick in people’s memories, or you can say something that makes you truly memorable. You can struggle to ingrain, or endeavor to engage.

Don’t settle for being something people won’t (or can’t) forget. Be unforgettable. Ditch the pitch.

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Reason #6 to Ditch The Pitch: being efficient vs. being effective

Elevator pitches are about being efficient.  You need to be quick, because when the bell rings and the doors open, your audience is going to leave (or depending on the length of the ride, run away).  You need to be thorough, because if you don’t name every product you have, you might miss the one your listener needs.  And you need to offer (force-feed) your business card, because it’s possible your business name or logo might remind them of the commercial they just ignored while counting down the moments until their escape.

Introductions are about being effective.  You don’t need to smother a captive audience with information when you can captivate your audience with insight.  You don’t need to race through a complicated menu of products when you can share a simple message about your purpose.  And you don’t need to give away business cards when people are so engaged they ask for one…because they want to know more!

I’m not downplaying the importance of conciseness.  FDR once said, “Be sincere; be brief; be seated.”   But getting through a pile is not the same as getting to the point.  Don’t struggle to say everything that might apply.  Strive to say something that will engage. Ditch the pitch.

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Wondering if your message is more commercial than connection?  Contact Rj and find out!

 

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